All posts tagged: time

Time is a Gift

When I am an old woman, the vivid image of your gray-blue eyes may flicker and the way she scolded you for crying. The sound of your whimper recalled only by recordings. That funny look that made her laugh, only a photo. One afternoon, the last ten miles home, you cried. She cried, too. Weary of the road, missing her YaYa. We were a family of four on our own for the first time, and the car filled with the kind of desperation that dissipates only when the engine dies. Your week old voice crescendoed. She matched your volume. I would have felt helpless except for your dad, who smiled back at me. Time slowed. I took in the June sun on summer kudzoo; the gray asphalt snaking through farmland, lush, even in drought; the unison of your distraught cries; the hand holding mine. I memorized the moment for myself for tomorrow, next week, next year. For the days when I am an old woman and unable to remember. Remember tough times. Sweet times. I …

Take Your Time

Read Genesis 1 I love to paint. Especially with oil. When I finally select a photo to paint, I first use a pencil to sketch the scene onto my canvas. Then, in accordance with what my high school art teacher taught me, I fill in the big spaces first. As a detail-oriented and eager person, it’s tough to wait for those finishing touches. Especially when painting can take months or even years. My second-ever oil painting took approximately two years to complete. In that time-span, I was teaching high school English and eventually planning a wedding. Though I could not wait to add my signature to the bottom right-hand corner of the canvas, I wanted to take my time and get it right. “Good art takes time,” I often tell myself when I begin a new project. God knows all about good art taking time. Though he could have created our entire existence in the blink of an eye, he chose to take it a day at a time. Truly, nothing about him is rushed. …

Time

T.S. Eliot’s poetic line, “April is the cruellest month,” always seemed a cruel statement to me. In my family, April is a celebratory time. It is September which is the cruelest. It is autumn which mixes “memory and desire.” Almost all the great losses of my life all begin in autumn, though I have lost in the winter, spring, and summer. Perhaps it is the dying fields and fading light which enhances sorrow experienced in autumn. Mercifully, the work of the Holy Spirit and the passage of time work together to bring perspective and healing. We can once again welcome any season with undying hope. On the anniversaries of loss, we can praise God for His infinite wisdom and mercy. See, I am doing a new thing!     Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the wilderness     and streams in the wasteland (Isaiah 43:19). Just as we cannot see the radiant blue above unstable, stormy skies, we cannot always see what God is doing through sorrow, and even …